she/her ENTJ ace cis

Welcome Traveler!

Feel free to rampage through my lines, breathe violently my hues and sift through my fleeting bouts of hopeful augmentation.

Art Tag : patomatic

My Art Blog - Patomatica

Commissions are currently open.

 

cool-critters:

Pom-pom crab (Lybia tessellata)

Lybia tessellata is a species of small crab in the family Xanthidae. It is found in shallow parts of the tropical Indo-Pacific Ocean. Like other members of the genus Lybia, it is commonly known as the pom-pom crab or boxer crab because of its habit of carrying a sea anemone around in each of its claws, these resembling pom-poms or boxing gloves. If attacked by a potential predator, it will threaten the aggressor with an anemone, the tentacles of which are well armed with cnidocytes (stinging cells). It is unable to feed itself with its chelae and uses the tentacles of the anemones to collect food particles which it then removes with its mobile maxillipeds. It is found on sandy and gravelly seabeds, where it is well camouflaged, and on live corals where it clings with its long, thin legs. 

photo credits: acquaportal, Marchione Giacomo

lavakid:

asexuals will win the skeleton war because we won’t be distracted by anyone’s bone titties

biocanvas:

Breathing tubes of a silkworm
A silkworm is the caterpillar of the domesticated silkmoth, Bombyx mori. Domesticated silkworms are entirely dependent on humans for survival, where they are mass bred to produce silk. The silk from Bombyx mori is more fragile and delicate than spider silk, which is five times stronger than steel but harder to obtain than its silkworm counterpart. Scientists in Japan have recently introduced a gene encoding spider silk into silkworms, producing silk that is 50% stronger and could be invaluable in manufacturing protective suits and better surgical sutures.
Image by Michael Gibson.

biocanvas:

Breathing tubes of a silkworm

A silkworm is the caterpillar of the domesticated silkmoth, Bombyx mori. Domesticated silkworms are entirely dependent on humans for survival, where they are mass bred to produce silk. The silk from Bombyx mori is more fragile and delicate than spider silk, which is five times stronger than steel but harder to obtain than its silkworm counterpart. Scientists in Japan have recently introduced a gene encoding spider silk into silkworms, producing silk that is 50% stronger and could be invaluable in manufacturing protective suits and better surgical sutures.

Image by Michael Gibson.

realmonstrosities:

Acoels are perhaps the simplest bilateral animals in the world!

They were initially thought to be flatworms, but molecular research shows their evolutionary roots probably date back to a time before flatworms ever existed.

Even as flatworms they were always quite strange. They have no gut, no kidney-like organs to help excrete waste and no gonads. The cells they use to create eggs and sperm are simply littered about in their internal tissue.

Their remarkable lack of organs hasn’t stopped them gaining success. They can be found relaxing on tropical corals, feasting on the bits of food they find on the surface. Some provide homes for brown, green or red algae and gain nourishment from them. Many crawl around between grains of sand on the sea floor.

Most impressively, there are some who live within cracks and channels within Arctic ice, seeking out algae to feed on.

So much for organs.

…Images: Samuel Chow/Stevie Smith/Christopher Laumer

Nanny: Well, basically there are two sorts of operas. There's your heavy opera, where basically people sing foreign and it goes like 'Oh oh oh, I am dyin', oh, I am dyin', oh, oh, oh, that's what I'm doin'', and there's your light opera, where they sing in foreign and it basically goes 'Beer! Beer! Beer! Beer! I like to drink lots of beer!' although sometimes they drink champagne instead. That's basically all of opera, really.

Granny: What? Is that it? Either dyin' or drinkin' beer?

Nanny: We-ell, there might be some other stuff, but generally it's stout or stabbin'.